Dougald Hine

Overlapping lives

This is a far-from-complete list of people whose lives overlap with mine in one way or another.

Friends, collaborators, neighbours, lovers, those I've learned from or plotted with. From people I had one wonderful conversation with, to others I talk to most days.

These are the people with whom I'm at home - or, at least, those of them who choose to be visible online.

  • Kalam Ali always knows where the free beer is in London. (Which is less convenient than it used to be, now that he lives in Berlin and I live in Stockholm.)
  • Jon Ardern is an artist and designer who started Ark Inc, a fictional company offering products and services that would retain their usefulness in the event of a social or economic collapse. Then he started getting contacted by people for whom collapse is already a reality. We worked together on the Long Doom? - a talk for the London Long Now meetup.
  • Dean Bavington is unravelling the mysteries of scarcity and management, starting from the collapse of the fisheries in his native Newfoundland and working out into the depths of philosophy. We met in Cuernavaca, Mexico at the colloquium to mark the fifth anniversary of the death of Ivan Illich.
  • Ansuman Biswas has the best CV of anyone I've ever met. This includes flying a magic carpet in the Soviet cosmonauts' training programme, being employed as an ornamental hermit at an English stately home, and playing with Oasis. We met on the first day of the London School of Art & Business.
  • Tessy Britton has a talent for connecting people and enthusing them, not least through good things like the Thriving too blog and the Social Spaces project.
  • Andy Broomfield is a New Media Nomad, an interaction designer and the unofficial archivist of the Institute for Collapsonomics. He has a gift for quietly making himself useful, not least in his thorough photographic documentation of mine and other people's projects.
  • Pete Brownell (AKA Greenman) is much more than just co-founder and CTO of School of Everything. He is an artist, Space Hijacker and inventor of new rituals. He teaches me wildness.
  • Pippa Buchanan plays thoughtfully with the edges of friendship and the possibilities of technology. She has been pursuing a DIY Masters and is the coordinator of the School of Webcraft.
  • Drew Buddie is the kind of teacher I would want my children to have, if I had children. He is full of curiosity, kindness and a sense of adventure. When I moved house, he foolishly volunteered to take seven boxes of books I was parting with and release them through BookCrossing.
  • Sofia Bustamante thinks everyone should have decent work - and is doing something about it. She also has the kind of smile which makes the world a better place. (Maybe you noticed it on the front page of this site?)
  • Ele Carpenter plays with the similarities between open source tech culture and old craft traditions.
  • Mamading Ceesay runs deep.
  • Mark Charmer is co-founder of Akvo, which makes it easy to bring development aid projects online, and runs the Movement Design Bureau, a thinktank for those shaping the future of movement. He is responsible for bringing Vinay Gupta to the UK - and the three of us used to run the GlueSniffers ICT for Development meetup.
  • Lottie Child is an artist who works with attention, with bodies and with public space. She teaches me the desirability of leaving my head, regrounding myself in the physical, the present moment and the nonverbal.
  • Jay Cousins is an inventor. He moved from Sheffield to Berlin, where I stayed in his guest pod during my Resilients journey in 2012. The last I knew, he was in Egypt.
  • Anne-Marie Culhane worked with me to make a little book called COMMONSense. I first met her as the founder of Grow Sheffield, harvesting the abundant commons of unpicked fruit trees around the city.
  • Marmaduke Dando is a singer of morose ballads and frisky jigs. He is bred from genuine pirate ancestry and now lives on a boat in London. His debut album, Heathcliffian Surly, includes two songs inspired by Dark Mountain.
  • Charlie Davies was features editor of The Face magazine at a stupidly young age. After it went bust, he started Pick Me Up (the DIY culture email, not the women's weekly) because he wanted a magazine that couldn't close down for lack of money. He taught me much of what I know about writing and creating projects. These days, he helps people have Very Clear Ideas.
  • Debbie Davies was once arrested for transportation of illegal weapons. She does undercover filming and models her own electronic skirts, probably not at the same time.
  • Lloyd Davis started the Tuttle Club, a Friday morning meetup for the self-unemployed through which I have met some very fine people.
  • Brian Degger is a member of the Australian science/art/technology diaspora and a one-man interdisciplinary research centre. He is into garage biotech and grows bioluminescent bacteria from smelly squid.
  • Antonio Dias made a long journey to visit the Dark Mountain. He lives in Rhode Island, where he is an artist, a writer and a designer of boats.
  • Warren Draper is an autodidact, an anglarchist and an animist. He is part of the fine conspiracy behind The Telling in Doncaster.
  • Alex Fradera teaches me how to make things up as I go along. He is chief fool of the Brixton Village Idiots.
  • Nik Gaffney is one half of FoAM. The first time I met him, we ended up shooting crossbows in a medieval cellar.
  • David Gauntlett is Professor of Media and Communications at the University of Westminster and another member of the Wednesday morning Unplugged gang. He likes getting people to play with Lego.
  • Andy Gibson is dangerously charming. Since co-founding School of Everything, we have shared many late night conversations and several Karaoke sessions. He is the author of Social by Social, a practical guide to "social technologies for social good", and the founder of Mind Apples, which wants to make looking after your mental health as natural as eating well or taking exercise.
  • Kristina Glushkova is descended from warlords, which explains a lot. She reminds me to apply to myself the advice I give to other people. Makerhood is the website she's working on to make it easy to buy things from people who live near you.
  • Viv Goodings is the master carpenter behind Ben Law's Woodman's Cottage. He promises one day he'll teach me how to catch a wild rabbit with a copy of the Guardian.
  • Vinay Gupta is trouble. Don't say you weren't warned.
  • Briony Greenhill is trying to find a "blended lifestyle," with a spade in one hand and a laptop in the other.
  • Tony Hall is a sensitive and thoughtful photographer, responsible for the picture on this page and several others around the site. It was his idea to start School of Everything: Unplugged. Hanging out with him on Wednesday mornings is the calm centre of my weeks in London.
  • Sara Haq is another fine photographer and always full of ideas and enthusiasm.
  • Bill Harbottle and I grew up singing in the folk clubs and streets of County Durham. His strange musical genius convinced me to abandon my early plans for a career as a rock star.
  • Edmund Harriss makes maths fascinating.
  • I first met Noel Hatch when we agreed to swap jobs via Twitter. I went to work with him in local government, then he came round to play at School of Everything.
  • Jamie Heckert is a nice, innocent young man from a small town in Iowa; a dangerous sexual anarchist; an ongoing process that resists definition, categorisation or other attempts at enclosure.
  • James Hester is an applied historian.
  • Iona Hine spends a lot of time with old bibles. She is also my sister.
  • Rachel Horne turns community arts upside down by following her instincts, in her work with the coalfield community where she grew up in South Yorkshire. I always come away inspired from talking with her.
  • Nick Hunt writes stories that strike deep chords of loss. His fiction appeared in the first three issues of Dark Mountain and, from the fourth issue, he joins us as an editor. He also tells stories with sound, such as this Radio 4 documentary about migrant workers in Dubai.
  • Anab Jain is an extremely smart designer, playing with the social and technological possibilities of the future.
  • David Jennings is curious about how we discover things in a world of cultural surplus. One of the ways I discover things is by hanging out with him at Unplugged on Wednesday mornings.
  • Indy Johar is an architect who thinks about big questions. We met at a Demos seminar on the future of higher education, where we were united in disbelief at the complacency of the university representatives.
  • Pat Kane is the author of The Play Ethic and one half of pop duo Hue And Cry.
  • Paul Kingsnorth is remarkably tolerant of my disorganisation. Besides being my co-conspirator in Dark Mountain, he writes powerful, passionate books and wields a mean scythe.
  • Steve Lawson is a legendary solo bass player and a lovely man.
  • Ann Light is a non-technical person who wandered into a computer science department and has spent the years since taking what she discovered there back into the outside world.
  • Dan Littler was one of the original editors of Pick Me Up. He came up with its motto: "Think what you would do if only you had the money, then work out how you can do it anyway." This may be the earliest formulation of the Big Society, but it's not his fault.
  • Chris Malins and I once organised a picnic for the G8 justice ministers. They stood us up, but lots of other people came.
  • Gaia Marcus sings the blues. Soon after meeting me at Social Innovation Camp, she became a regular assistant to the early Space Makers Network and various other projects. When we set up Spacemakers as an agency, she took over running the network. These days, she does network analysis with the RSA's Connected Communities team.
  • Anna Maybank and I used to share an office when she was running Social Innovation Camp, which gets people together to create socially useful things out of the internet. She was last seen doing an MBA at UC Berkeley.
  • Anthony McCann and I met in the back seat of a car on the way to a conference. I'd already read his brilliant paper on "the information commons". For the next six months, we would meet every Monday at 8am at Cafe 22a for long, conversational breakfasts. (I think our record was the day we were still there at 2pm.) These days he lives near Derry, teaches ethnomusicology and is responsible for Crafting Gentleness.
  • Smari McCarthy is a thoughtful anarchist and practical chaos technician. He's well on his way to taking Reykjavik, then he'll take Berlin.
  • I once talked Kevin McGeary into spending a summer selling books door-to-door and I still feel slightly guilty about this. He moved to China to recover and now writes and records songs in Mandarin.
  • Bridget McKenzie is director of Flow Associates which gets museums, arts, science and educational organisations to make better use of the internet. I think she was the first person to put money towards funding the Dark Mountain manifesto.
  • Paul Miller was working at Demos when I first blathered at him in a pub about Illich. School of Everything came out of conversations around his kitchen table and he continues to lead the company. He is also co-founder of Social Innovation Camp.
  • Joseph Kotrie Monson is my attorney and a good man in a tight spot.
  • Abi Nielsen is a disobedient child.
  • Mark Nielsen gave me my first lesson in HTML and CSS at Access Space in 2005. If I'd paid more attention, this website would be much better coded.
  • Gregory Norminton married one of my best friends from university, but soon became a friend in his own right. He's a novelist, an aphorist and one of the many brilliant writers I'm proud to have published in Dark Mountain.
  • Adrienne Odasso is one of my fellow editors at Dark Mountain and a fine poet in her own right.
  • Dan Olner and I met in a squatted social centre in Sheffield. Since then, he has spent time processing his activist intuitions through the intellectual mill of a PhD which crosses the boundaries of geography, economics and mathematical modelling.
  • John O'Shea proposes a Meat Licence, which would require those who want to eat meat to participate in the act of killing an animal.
  • Steve Ounanian is a playful troublemaker who makes puppets and pedals tandems. He created the Dark Mountain logo.
  • Sophia Parker is exploring the reality of economic fragility, looking at how low income families are coping in post-crash America.
  • You'll sometimes hear Lucy Pearson talking about children's literature on the radio. She's known me since I was 17 and thinks it's very funny that people who've only known me in my thirties see me as someone who does things. Because she knows what a talent I once had for doing nothing.
  • Justin Pickard is a gonzo futurist.
  • Alison Powell is a social theorist and storyteller who has rewound her family's colonial journey, finding her way to London from the wide horizons of Saskatchewan.
  • Jim Prevett is an artist and moved to London from Sheffield about the same time I did. He is Emergent Technologies Producer at SPACE media, hosted one of the early Space Makers meetups - and, when he was at Access Space, secured the funding which eventually led to COMMONSense.
  • Rachel Rose Reid is a magical storyteller and much else. We first met when she unexpectedly called at my house at nearly midnight and I fed her French onion soup, which I just happened to have spent the past two hours making on a whim. Somehow this all seemed entirely reasonable at the time.
  • Jenny Reina is a hunter-gatherer.
  • Cassie Robinson straddles more worlds than I do, which is probably how we met. Our Intimate Lives is her project to open up conversations about sexuality and intimacy. She also sends wonderful letters.
  • Julia Shalet is the action woman without whom Spacemakers might never have turned from a network into an agency. She is also founder of The Digital Youth Project.
  • Anton Shelupanov does crime. To be more specific, he leads the Young Foundation's criminal justice programme. In his spare time, he rewrites the penal codes of central Asian countries and fronts the death-blues band Bleak.
  • Tom Stafford lectures in psychology at Sheffield University and is fascinating to talk to about more or less any subject. He is co-author of Mind Hacks.
  • Nick Stewart started out making performance art on the streets of Belfast in the 1980s. These days, he lives in London and teaches in Winchester. In 2012, we travelled to Mexico together to make a film.
  • Chris T-T writes angry, eloquent, beautiful songs that have been part of the soundtrack to Dark Mountain since it first surfaced. He also writes a column for the Morning Star.
  • Andrew Taggart is a freelance philosopher and a beautiful soul.
  • Marco van Belle and I started at Radio Sheffield in the same week, but he had more staying power than I did. He finally escaped the BBC and is now making award-winning fantasy films starring Brian Blessed.
  • Ben Vickers is an internet personality based in London.
  • Matt Weston helps people think differently about businesses, organisations and making things happen. He has a gift for finding simple stories and maps that change the way you see a situation. When I left the UK in 2012, I was delighted to have him step into my shoes at Spacemakers.
  • Steve Wheeler and I first crossed paths in a darkened quadrangle in our late teens, then again in a treehouse, a decade or so later. He was thinking and writing about collapse before almost anyone in the UK. I don't think he actually weaves steel, but it's possible.